Winning Marketing Concepts Made Easy!

There’s nothing more vital to having a successful winning product that will improve your bottom line than having a winning marketing concept. All too often, products that have been promoted and hyped as being the “next big thing” have fallen on their faces because of having a poor marketing concepts. An example the author mentions of a product that got the ide If you are interested in improving your product’s image and increasing your sales, you owe it to yourselves to get, read, and study Martha Guidry’s latest book, Marketing Concepts That Win! One of the best aspects about Marketing Concepts That Win is that Guidry provides excellent examples and case studies throughout her book, and she offers tips, tools, and useful advice to help her readers refine the concept they’ve come up with so that potential consumers identify with the product more. For instance, Chapter 8, “Reason To Believe,” gets into the importance of the reason to believe, or RTB, to a product’s promise to the consumer.

RTBs are often built up over time, and it’s basically a combination of the branding of a product and its motto or other aspects of a company that have stood the test of time and which the public associates the company/product with. RTBs make the public look more favorably towards a new product companies come up with based on a belief system about the company’s track record and branding over the years. What the author terms “brand equity” plays a substantial part in this development of RTBs, as with Smucker’s slogan “With a name like Smucker’s, it has to be good,” or Apple’s image among consumers as being “hip, cool, easy-to-use,” and having “innovative approaches to technology.”

Chapter 4 goes into what the five basic elements are that comprise a concept: a headline, an ACB (accepted consumer belief), it’s benefit to the consumer, the RTB, and an effective wrap-up. It’s a very useful and informative chapter that analyzes what elements make the difference between a good concept and mediocre ones. With Martha Guidry’s guidance, you can learn how to formulate the concepts to sell your products to the widest audience possible.

What are some of the other topics that the book covers? The author takes her readers from the beginning stages she discusses in Chapter 1: Concept Development, to formulating an outline of a concept, to what she calls in Chapter 5 “CleAR,” thinking being the way to come up with the best concepts. The letters refer to “the intersection of three critical areas: content, language, and relevance.” Guidry goes into the importance of each off these three concept elements and how, when they’re effectively combined, they make the overall concept a stronger one that resonates more with consumers.

Marketing Concepts That Win! combines the knowledge of more than fifteen years’ worth of experience that the author has had in brand management, concept development, and research experience. Martha Guidry has walked the walk, having spent six years in consumer marketing for Procter & Gamble and Hasbro. She’s developed concepts to help launch new products for companies such as Arby’s, DuPont, Bush’s Beans, Amway, Pizza Hut, and Dial. If you are interested in marketing and branding your product more effectively, and want to develop a powerful concept to sell it, I urge you to check out Martha Guidry’s fascinating book today!There’s nothing more vital to having a successful winning product that will improve your bottom line than having a winning marketing concept. All too often, products that have been promoted and hyped as being the “next big thing” have fallen on their faces because of having a poor marketing concept. An example the author mentions of a product that got the idea of having a good marketing concept right is McDonald’s McCafe, that has successfully competed against brands such as Starbuck’s. If you are interested in improving your product’s image and increasing your sales, you owe it to yourselves to get, read, and study Martha Guidry’s latest book, Marketing Concepts That Win! One of the best aspects about Marketing Concepts That Win is that Guidry provides excellent examples and case studies throughout her book, and she offers tips, tools, and useful advice to help her readers refine the concept they’ve come up with so that potential consumers identify with the product more. For instance, Chapter 8, “Reason To Believe,” gets into the importance of the reason to believe, or RTB, to a product’s promise to the consumer.

The Marketing Concept

During the 1960s, the term ‘marketing concept’ emerged. It was a ‘revolution’ because what can be considered as modern businesses have changed their strategies and the total activities of their businesses. William J. Stanton, Professor of Marketing at the University of Colorado stated:

“The marketing concept is based on two fundamental beliefs. First, all company planning, policies and operations should be oriented toward the customer; second, profitable sales volume should be the goal of a firm. In its fullest sense, the marketing concept is a philosophy of business which states that the customer’s want satisfaction is the economic and social justification of a company’s existence. Consequently, all company activities in production, engineering, and finance, as well as in marketing, must be devoted first to determining what the customer’s wants are and then to satisfying those wants while still making a reasonable profit.”

A marketing executive at the General Electric Company, one of the first companies formally to recognize and implement the marketing concept, emphasized the important role of marketing in a nice way when he said: “We feel that marketing is a fundamental business philosophy.” It is obvious that this definition recognizes the importance of implementing the philosophy of marketing’s functions and methods of organizational structuring. Although it must be realized that marketing’s functions and methods are not, in themselves, the philosophy.

But the best-known writer on the subject at that time was Professor Theodore Levitt of Harvard. He had this to say: “Every major industry was once a growth industry. But some that are not riding a wave of growth enthusiasm are very much in the shadow of decline. Others which are thought of as seasoned growth industries have actually stopped growing. In every case the reason growth is threatened, slowed, or stopped is not because the market is saturated. It is because there has been a failure of management. The failure is at the top. The executives responsible for it in the last analysis are those who deal with broad aims and policies.”

The excuses used for declining growth of the railroads, for example, were not because the need for passenger and freight transportation declined. That grew. The railroads were in trouble not because the need was filled by others like cars, trucks, airplanes, even telephones, but because it was not filled by the railroads themselves. The railroads companies let others take customers away from them because they assumed themselves to be in the railroad business rather than in the transportation business. The reason they defined their industry wrong was because they were product-oriented instead of customer-oriented.

Peter Drucker, the world’s leading writer on the whole field of management, says: “It is the customer who determines what a business is. It is the customer alone whose willingness to pay for a good or service converts economic resources into wealth, things into goods. What the business thinks it produces is not of first importance-especially not to the future of the business and to its success… What the customer thinks he is buying, what he considers value, is decisive-it determines what a business is, what it produces and whether it will prosper. And what the customer buys and considers value is never a product. It is always utility, that is, what a product or service does for him…. Because its purpose is to create a customer, the business enterprise has two-and only these two-basic functions; marketing and innovation. Marketing and innovation produce results; all the rest are ‘cost’. It is vital for every company regularly to ask this question ‘what business are we in?’ and to answer it in terms of what its customers buy not in terms of what it produces.”

More recently, Professor Peter Doyle has said that “Marketing-the task of seeing to provide customers with superior value-is so central that it cannot be seen as just another function alongside production, finance or personnel. The central task of management is to find better ways of meeting the needs of customers.”

source: http://en.articlesgratuits.com/the-marketing-concept-id1429.php

Video Marketing Concepts on How to Bring Loads of Traffic to Your Website

More and more people are watching videos every day. They are not just watching videos in YouTube, but also in other video websites as well. As an internet marketer, you should take advantage of this opportunity to use videos in bringing in more traffic to your website. The following video marketing concepts are essential to video marketing as it is such a powerful tool in finally getting that highly targeted traffic:

1.      Know Your Target Market

One video marketing concept you should know is that you have to understand what your target market is. You can do some research regarding what type of demographics your target market belongs to. For example, if you are promoting a product or service about video games, they are likely to belong in the teenage to adolescent age group. If your website service is about cell phones then your target market may belong to a wide range of groups since anyone can be buying cell phones these days.

2.      Write Content which is Compelling

After knowing your target market, another video marketing concept to take into mind is that you should write content for your video which is compelling enough for the viewers to stick with it right to the end. You can write effective content to your videos by knowing what appeals to your target market. So this again takes research on what clicks to the people who view similar videos to yours. Videos which are short, yet succinct enough in its message will be viewed the most since it takes easily to load or to download in computers.

3.      Use keywords

Never underestimate the power of keywords in driving more traffic to your website. Keywords are also very applicable while creating content for your video since they are the most probable words or phrases to be searched by people. This video marketing concept is so important that if you don’t use it, your video may remain obscure forever. With keywords, people will easily search to your video and are most likely to go beyond and view your website. This could get you prospective customers to the content, products or services you are promoting.

4.      Using Your Creativity 

The videos that actually appeal to a lot of viewers are not those who follow a strict formula in video marketing, but those who use these tips and strategies effectively to create their own style. By being creative, you may get more traffic that what you ever thought possible. You can also attract more viewers to your videos, thus having a bigger chance to lead prospective customers to your website. This video marketing concept is rarely used, so use your creativity wisely.

By knowing what works and what doesn’t, you can get inspiration to create and post your videos in such a way that it will lead your viewers to click through your website. Videos get a higher ranking in search engines, so use this opportunity to get that traffic you truly want for your website. You can learn more from the one who knows video marketing the best through this intensive course on video marketing concepts.